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Cultural Experiences

Traditional Food & Beverage

Phở is Vietnam’s world-famous noodle dish. Originated in North Vietnam and traditionally enjoyed as a nutrition-packed breakfast, Phở is now now found throughout the country in a myriad of flavor variations, and available any time of the day or night. With its heavenly aroma and delicious flavor, Phở is a favorite culinary delight for visitors to Hoi An and is perfect for breakfast, lunch, or revitalizing after a full day’s adventure. Phở Hoi An is a delightful variation on Phở Hanoi and is prepared with a base of rice noodles, similar in shape to linguine noodles. The Phở chef begins with dry noodles which are then cooked for each serving with boiling broth to ensure noodles have the perfect consistency for every bowl. Phở Hoi An’s broth has a pleasantly sweet and spicy aroma from green onions, cinnamon, glove, and other aromatics. Roasted peanuts are also added to the broth of Phở Hoi An. Thin slices of beef which are cooked upon contact with the boiling broth are the most traditional protein added to Phở however chicken and vegetarian options are also readily available. Your Phở will be served alongside fresh herbs, bean sprouts, chili sauce, and pepper flakes which you can add to your preferred taste. The ingredients in your bowl of Phở is a beautiful painter’s pallet of green herbs, golden peanuts, red beef, and white noodles.
Mi Quang is a Vietnamese noodle dish that originated in the area of Hoi An in the Quảng Nam Province of Central Vietnam. As with Phở, My Quang is a rice noodle-based dish served in aromatic broth with a medley of fresh, delicious ingredients and is most frequently enjoyed for breakfast. My Quang noodles are wider and thicker than Phở noodles and are served in a smaller amount of broth. To prepare this dish, the chef must carefully select each ingredient and spice to give My Quang its trademark flavor. Before cooking, the noodles are first soaked in water for at least 1 hour, then pressed, coated with thin leave, then stacked against each other and cut into strands. In order for the noodles to be non-sticky, the chef must use a small amount of peanut oil so that the noodles do not stick together. My Quang’s broth includes the ingredients of cinnamon, cabbage, leafy greens, shredded banana flower, shrimp paste, roasted peanuts, green onion, lime, and chili paste. Traditional My Quang is served with shrimp (which you eat with the shell and head left on), thinly sliced tender pork, and small hard boiled quail eggs however you can also find My Quang served with locally-raised chicken or fish. Unlike other noodle dishes which have broth filled to the rim of the bowl, the amount of broth used in this My Quang is much lower. My Quang is the most popular noodle dish in Hoi An and the surrounding Quang Nam Province. Unlike Phở which is widely known throughout Vietnam and the world, My Quang is unique to Central Vietnam. It’s not uncommon for someone from Hanoi or Ho Chi Minh City to never have tried it before. However, there is no neighborhood, village, market, or corner in the region without Quang noodles. Definitely try this Hoi An speciality!
Across the ancient town of Hoi An is a land known as Cam Nam. Here, along the Thu Bon river, chefs produce a once-in-a-lifetime meal of delectable, sweet mussels. In Cam Nam, mussels are harvested daily by the local villagers which are then thoroughly cleaned of any sand before being cooked. Chefs steam the live mussels until their shells open to reveal the succulent shellfish within. Cam Nam mussels can be enjoyed with a bit of oil, dried onions, and crushed pepper, or served with a stir fry of noodles, vegetables, fish sauce, fresh chilis and peanuts. and noodles. Stir-fried noodles, mixed with chopped vegetables, chili sauce, fish sauce, fresh chili and peanuts roasted puree can also be enjoyed. When in Hoi An, pass the Cam Nam Bridge and there will be a row of mussel purveyors waiting to welcome and serve you!
A favorite Hoi An dish on a cool day, is a bowl of warm sweet corn soup. While strolling through Hoi An’s Ancient Town, it won’t be hard to find yourself a dish of this savory soup prepared by a street vendor. Locals enjoy sweet corn with a cup of tea to reconnect with a feeling of family and warmth. Vietnamese farmers harvest the corn near dawn when there is a dense fog hanging over the fields. This is because it’s when the corn is at its most perfect because it is moist and full of nutrients. When preparing this classic dish, the chef must choose corn that is neither too young nor overly ripe for perfect roasting. With its outer shell peeled away, the corn should be white and slightly opaque. First, the corn is peeled and using a using sharp knife, then is thinly cut before boiling for about five minutes. In the process of stewing the corn, it should be stirred frequently so that the soup does not form any lumps. When it is almost ready a touch of sugar and a little bit of ginger is added. It’s home cooking for the soul!
We can recommend where to try these Hoi An dishes and much more.  Contact us anytime at Eresa@sunrisehoian.vn or +84 (0235) 393 7777.

Traditional Food & Beverage

Phở is Vietnam’s world-famous noodle dish. Originated in North Vietnam and traditionally enjoyed as a nutrition-packed breakfast, Phở is now now found throughout the country in a myriad of flavor variations, and available any time of the day or night. With its heavenly aroma and delicious flavor, Phở is a favorite culinary delight for visitors to Hoi An and is perfect for breakfast, lunch, or revitalizing after a full day’s adventure. Phở Hoi An is a delightful variation on Phở Hanoi and is prepared with a base of rice noodles, similar in shape to linguine noodles. The Phở chef begins with dry noodles which are then cooked for each serving with boiling broth to ensure noodles have the perfect consistency for every bowl. Phở Hoi An’s broth has a pleasantly sweet and spicy aroma from green onions, cinnamon, glove, and other aromatics. Roasted peanuts are also added to the broth of Phở Hoi An. Thin slices of beef which are cooked upon contact with the boiling broth are the most traditional protein added to Phở however chicken and vegetarian options are also readily available. Your Phở will be served alongside fresh herbs, bean sprouts, chili sauce, and pepper flakes which you can add to your preferred taste. The ingredients in your bowl of Phở is a beautiful painter’s pallet of green herbs, golden peanuts, red beef, and white noodles.
Mi Quang is a Vietnamese noodle dish that originated in the area of Hoi An in the Quảng Nam Province of Central Vietnam. As with Phở, My Quang is a rice noodle-based dish served in aromatic broth with a medley of fresh, delicious ingredients and is most frequently enjoyed for breakfast. My Quang noodles are wider and thicker than Phở noodles and are served in a smaller amount of broth. To prepare this dish, the chef must carefully select each ingredient and spice to give My Quang its trademark flavor. Before cooking, the noodles are first soaked in water for at least 1 hour, then pressed, coated with thin leave, then stacked against each other and cut into strands. In order for the noodles to be non-sticky, the chef must use a small amount of peanut oil so that the noodles do not stick together. My Quang’s broth includes the ingredients of cinnamon, cabbage, leafy greens, shredded banana flower, shrimp paste, roasted peanuts, green onion, lime, and chili paste. Traditional My Quang is served with shrimp (which you eat with the shell and head left on), thinly sliced tender pork, and small hard boiled quail eggs however you can also find My Quang served with locally-raised chicken or fish. Unlike other noodle dishes which have broth filled to the rim of the bowl, the amount of broth used in this My Quang is much lower. My Quang is the most popular noodle dish in Hoi An and the surrounding Quang Nam Province. Unlike Phở which is widely known throughout Vietnam and the world, My Quang is unique to Central Vietnam. It’s not uncommon for someone from Hanoi or Ho Chi Minh City to never have tried it before. However, there is no neighborhood, village, market, or corner in the region without Quang noodles. Definitely try this Hoi An speciality!
Across the ancient town of Hoi An is a land known as Cam Nam. Here, along the Thu Bon river, chefs produce a once-in-a-lifetime meal of delectable, sweet mussels. In Cam Nam, mussels are harvested daily by the local villagers which are then thoroughly cleaned of any sand before being cooked. Chefs steam the live mussels until their shells open to reveal the succulent shellfish within. Cam Nam mussels can be enjoyed with a bit of oil, dried onions, and crushed pepper, or served with a stir fry of noodles, vegetables, fish sauce, fresh chilis and peanuts. and noodles. Stir-fried noodles, mixed with chopped vegetables, chili sauce, fish sauce, fresh chili and peanuts roasted puree can also be enjoyed. When in Hoi An, pass the Cam Nam Bridge and there will be a row of mussel purveyors waiting to welcome and serve you!
A favorite Hoi An dish on a cool day, is a bowl of warm sweet corn soup. While strolling through Hoi An’s Ancient Town, it won’t be hard to find yourself a dish of this savory soup prepared by a street vendor. Locals enjoy sweet corn with a cup of tea to reconnect with a feeling of family and warmth. Vietnamese farmers harvest the corn near dawn when there is a dense fog hanging over the fields. This is because it’s when the corn is at its most perfect because it is moist and full of nutrients. When preparing this classic dish, the chef must choose corn that is neither too young nor overly ripe for perfect roasting. With its outer shell peeled away, the corn should be white and slightly opaque. First, the corn is peeled and using a using sharp knife, then is thinly cut before boiling for about five minutes. In the process of stewing the corn, it should be stirred frequently so that the soup does not form any lumps. When it is almost ready a touch of sugar and a little bit of ginger is added. It’s home cooking for the soul!
We can recommend where to try these Hoi An dishes and much more.  Contact us anytime at Eresa@sunrisehoian.vn or +84 (0235) 393 7777.

Travel Experiences

Here are a few unique attractions and activities  you can enjoy in Hoi An:Hoi An Coconut ForestAn Bang Beach of Hoi AnCua Dai BeachTra Que Vegetable VillageBicycle tour to visit the most popular areas of Hoi AnTour to Cham IslandScuba diving tourMy Son Sanctuary tourSpa and massage treatmentsVietnamese coffee in Hoi An ancient townRelax at a beach bar in An BangHave dinner on An Bang beachTake a rowboat tour in coconut forestTake a cooking class in the forestWe’ll be happy to arrange your visit to these destinations. Just contact us at Eresa@sunrisehoian.vn or +84 (0235) 393 7777.

Travel Experiences

Here are a few unique attractions and activities  you can enjoy in Hoi An:Hoi An Coconut ForestAn Bang Beach of Hoi AnCua Dai BeachTra Que Vegetable VillageBicycle tour to visit the most popular areas of Hoi AnTour to Cham IslandScuba diving tourMy Son Sanctuary tourSpa and massage treatmentsVietnamese coffee in Hoi An ancient townRelax at a beach bar in An BangHave dinner on An Bang beachTake a rowboat tour in coconut forestTake a cooking class in the forestWe’ll be happy to arrange your visit to these destinations. Just contact us at Eresa@sunrisehoian.vn or +84 (0235) 393 7777.

Hoi An Cultural Festivals

Every year, on the occasion of Lunar March (March 23rd), a ceremony of worshiping the lady Thien Hau is held in Fujian Assembly Hall and Duong Thuong Assembly Hall in Hoi An. The festival is called the birth anniversary of the lady Thien Hau. This festival is derived from the beliefs of the Chinese merchants, because the day before they often used to sail across the sea, travel everywhere to trade and exchange goods. On their dangerous sea voyage, people faced natural disasters and danger, but as legend goes, many were rescued by a sea goddess, they believe to be Thien Hau Thanh Mau.
Also known as Vietnamese Mother's Day, this festival takes place on the 15th day of the seventh month in Lunar Calendar. It is the largest Vietnam holiday after Tet. On this day, people visit pagodas and temples to worship their ancestors and make offerings such as food and clothing. Presents are also given to living parents to show appreciation and gratitude.
Every year, on the full moon day of July, many Vietnamese in general and the Hoi An people in particular go to the temple to pray for those who have escaped the escape, especially for the mother to live with us. At many temples in Hoi An, Vu Lan festival is held in a warm affection when everyone is devoted to the heart of the birth.
Held on the eighth day of the eighth annual calendar year, the Mid-Autumn Festival is a traditional celebration for Vietnamese children. It is an opportunity for families to visit together and share in the eating of delicious moon cakes and for young generations express their gratitude to the old generation and for parents to show their love for their children through gifts.
The Lunar New Year, known in Vietnam as Tet, or the Vietnamese New Year, is the most important celebration in Vietnamese culture.Tet celebrates the arrival of spring and is celebrated on the same day as Chinese New Year. Many Vietnamese prepare for Tet by cooking special holiday food and cleaning the house. These foods include bánh chưng, bánh dày, dried young bamboo soup (canh măng), giò, and sticky rice. Many customs are practiced during Tết, such as visiting a person's house on the first day of the new year (xông nhà), ancestor worship, wishing New Year's greetings, giving lucky money to children and elderly people, and opening a shop. Tết is also an occasion for pilgrims and family reunions. They start forgetting about the troubles of the past year and hope for a better upcoming year. They consider Tết to be the first day of spring, and the festival is often called Hội xuân (spring festival).
On the 10th day of the first lunar month of the year, hundreds of households in Hoi An’s Thanh Ha pottery village visit the Nam Dieu shrine.
Long Chu is a royal boat, a symbol of divinity believed to to scare away epidemics and diseases. The Long Chu Festival includes a procession in which a fabricated boat and elephant are carried through the town and then to the river for a ceremonial release into the sea. The Festival is very lively and includes singing and games.
Every year, on the 7th of the first lunar month, villagers from Tra Que Village (Cam Ha Commune, Hoi An City) organize the Bong Bridge Festival to pay tribute to their ancestors who founded Tra Que Vegetable Village and to pray for rain and good weather for a successful harvest.
We’ll be happy to tell you more about these Hoi An area cultural festivals and other special events that may be taking place during your visit. Contact us any ime at Eresa@sunrisehoian.vn or +84 (0235) 393 7777.

Hoi An Cultural Festivals

Every year, on the occasion of Lunar March (March 23rd), a ceremony of worshiping the lady Thien Hau is held in Fujian Assembly Hall and Duong Thuong Assembly Hall in Hoi An. The festival is called the birth anniversary of the lady Thien Hau. This festival is derived from the beliefs of the Chinese merchants, because the day before they often used to sail across the sea, travel everywhere to trade and exchange goods. On their dangerous sea voyage, people faced natural disasters and danger, but as legend goes, many were rescued by a sea goddess, they believe to be Thien Hau Thanh Mau.
Also known as Vietnamese Mother's Day, this festival takes place on the 15th day of the seventh month in Lunar Calendar. It is the largest Vietnam holiday after Tet. On this day, people visit pagodas and temples to worship their ancestors and make offerings such as food and clothing. Presents are also given to living parents to show appreciation and gratitude.
Every year, on the full moon day of July, many Vietnamese in general and the Hoi An people in particular go to the temple to pray for those who have escaped the escape, especially for the mother to live with us. At many temples in Hoi An, Vu Lan festival is held in a warm affection when everyone is devoted to the heart of the birth.
Held on the eighth day of the eighth annual calendar year, the Mid-Autumn Festival is a traditional celebration for Vietnamese children. It is an opportunity for families to visit together and share in the eating of delicious moon cakes and for young generations express their gratitude to the old generation and for parents to show their love for their children through gifts.
The Lunar New Year, known in Vietnam as Tet, or the Vietnamese New Year, is the most important celebration in Vietnamese culture.Tet celebrates the arrival of spring and is celebrated on the same day as Chinese New Year. Many Vietnamese prepare for Tet by cooking special holiday food and cleaning the house. These foods include bánh chưng, bánh dày, dried young bamboo soup (canh măng), giò, and sticky rice. Many customs are practiced during Tết, such as visiting a person's house on the first day of the new year (xông nhà), ancestor worship, wishing New Year's greetings, giving lucky money to children and elderly people, and opening a shop. Tết is also an occasion for pilgrims and family reunions. They start forgetting about the troubles of the past year and hope for a better upcoming year. They consider Tết to be the first day of spring, and the festival is often called Hội xuân (spring festival).
On the 10th day of the first lunar month of the year, hundreds of households in Hoi An’s Thanh Ha pottery village visit the Nam Dieu shrine.
Long Chu is a royal boat, a symbol of divinity believed to to scare away epidemics and diseases. The Long Chu Festival includes a procession in which a fabricated boat and elephant are carried through the town and then to the river for a ceremonial release into the sea. The Festival is very lively and includes singing and games.
Every year, on the 7th of the first lunar month, villagers from Tra Que Village (Cam Ha Commune, Hoi An City) organize the Bong Bridge Festival to pay tribute to their ancestors who founded Tra Que Vegetable Village and to pray for rain and good weather for a successful harvest.
We’ll be happy to tell you more about these Hoi An area cultural festivals and other special events that may be taking place during your visit. Contact us any ime at Eresa@sunrisehoian.vn or +84 (0235) 393 7777.

T+84 (0235) 393 7777

Eresa@sunrisehoian.vn

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